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Bristlecone pine and carbon dating

Flood and Creation Dating the oldest Bristlecone pines now living quite possibly have been growing since right after the flood. These varied conditions could allow a slightly more recent date which may even closely match Ussher's date of 2350 B. Even without adjustment, the living Bristlecones do fit well within the range of dates for the flood provided by numerous Biblical scholars.

So far, this amazing record from the Bristlecone pines only applies to the southwestern portion of the United States and has become useful also to the field of archaeology where ancient roof beams have been more accurately dated using the tree-ring growth records.The White Mountains rise abruptly east of the Sierra Nevadas, reaching over 14,000 feet in elevation near the ancient Bristlecone pine forest.They lie in the rain shadow of the Sierras, with an average annual rainfall of 10-13 inches.Bristlecones grow in other similar areas and were already the focus of much speculation when Schulman arrived on the scene in 1953.The Bristlecone pine became famous in scientific circles through the work of Dr.Edmund Schulman (1908-1958) of the University of Arizona.

His dendrochronological studies spanned almost thirty years, of which the last five were spent mostly in the White Mountains.

Through the study of annual growth rings of these trees, a fairly precise method of absolute dating has been obtained.

A reported 4900-year-old tree in the Snake Ridge region of Nevada was actually discovered to be only 3000 years old.

Ferguson then started sampling the dead wood found scattered on the southern slopes of the mountains and found that the loose dead wood did not match the existing ring patterns. The actual date may be adjusted for extremely wet years which occurred in the past, as shown by the numerous dry lakes in the desert regions of eastern California and Nevada.

The gap between living and dead wood was first breached by A. Douglas while testing prehistoric beams in ruins near Show Low, Arizona. Experiments show the trees can grow more than one ring in unusual seasons.

Of course, "modern" evolutionists have held these dates up for ridicule, but the Bristlecone pine research may well verify them. Some experiments have even suggested that many periods of time could have been characterized by the growth of one extra ring every one to four years, with evidence in controlled laboratory situations showing extra ring growth tied to short drought periods.